Aam Aadmi Party or All Amateurs Party (AAP)?

G.S. Vijay Kumar By G.S. Vijay Kumar, 22nd Dec 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/37s738hy/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Columns & Opinions

The way the Aam Aadmi Party ( AAP ) has reacted to the Congress Party’s offer, one does get a feeling that they are shunning away from the responsibility of forming a government, for reasons best known to them. Besides, the stand adopted by their leaders does leave one somewhat confused with regard to their game plans.

The question that arises is whether this is the Aam Aadmi Party or the All Amateurs Party (AAP)? Their post- results approach so far suggests the latter though.

Aam Aadmi Party or All Amateurs Party (AAP)?

Whilst it is a fact that Arvind Kejriwal’s Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) has performed extremely well in the recently concluded Delhi Assembly Elections, the magic figure of 36 has eluded them, as with the Bhartiya Janata Party. Although the BJP is the single largest party with 31 seats, they cannot form a government as they do not have the support of another 5 members in the legislature. Therefore, the responsibility of forming a government passes on to the next largest party, the AAP. They too have only 28 seats but the Congress Party, with 8 seats, has offered its unconditional support to the AAP to form a government.
AAP’s predicament is somewhat different though. They have fought the elections on “neither Congress nor the BJP” plank and their leaders have categorically said on many occasions that they will neither support the Congress or BJP nor take their support to form a government. If they stick to their original position, Delhi has no other choice but to have a re-election sometime later.
However, something has changed between then and now. It now appears that the AAP is seriously re-considering their options after the offer of unconditional support from the Congress Party. This is where they require clarity, whether to deviate from their original stand or not. If they decide to go ahead with the Congress Party’s support, even if it is for the sake of the people of Delhi who deserve a government, they need to behave more responsibly with maturity and tact. This is where they seem to have some problems.
The way the AAP has reacted to the Congress Party’s offer, one does get a feeling that they are shunning away from the responsibility of forming a government, for reasons best known to them. Besides, the stand adopted by their leaders does leave one somewhat confused with regard to their game plans.
To begin with, they have laid down 18 conditions in front of Congress and the BJP for accepting their unconditional/ constructive support to form a government. If one goes through the conditions laid down carefully, one notices the anomalies that are present in them. For instance, they have raised the point of passing of the Jan Lokpal Bill as one of their 18 conditions. Now, it is a known fact that Jan Lokpal Bill can be passed only by the Parliament and not by the assembly. Therefore, one fails to understand the logic of raising this issue at this point of time. What would they have done if they had got a majority in the assembly? Would they have formed a government or would they still raise this question? It appears that they are either ill-informed with regard to the passing of legislations or scared of forming a government and the resultant responsibility that befalls on them.
Similarly they have raised the issue of complete statehood for Delhi. Here again, the Assembly cannot decide the statehood status of Delhi. Raising of such issues merely reinforces the vacuum that exists in their thought process. This indeed is a setback for a new party which gave us hopes of a new body polity in the country. The question that arises is whether this is the Aam Aadmi Party or the All Amateurs Party (AAP)? Their post- results approach so far suggests the latter though.
Are they aware that they fought the Delhi Assembly elections and not the parliamentary elections? Are they aware that they have done well but do not have a majority in the assembly? If they are, then why are they behaving so arrogantly?
Their letter to the Congress Party and the BJP reminds us of the old joke which is as follows.
“I am ready to play cricket and bat provided the following is observed.
1) Nobody shall bowl a fast delivery.
2) Nobody shall stop the ball when I hit.
3) Nobody shall take a catch when I hit.
4) Nobody shall run me out.
5) Nobody shall appeal for my wicket.
6) Additionally, the bowlers shall aim at my bat rather than the wicket.

If the above conditions are acceptable, I am prepared to bat.

Don’t say later that I cannot play cricket.” This has been the approach of Arvind Kejriwal.

Any political party cannot afford to be dogmatic in their approach and expect things to go either their way or the highway. They need tact and maturity to deal with the people, particularly the opposition parties. They also need to be realistic, diplomatic and try to build consensus in order to move forward. One needs to engage with the opposition leaders and not have a confrontationist approach all the time.
The ideal approach would be to accept the Congress Party’s support and form a government with a common minimum programme. They should understand that elections are held to form a government and not for anything else. They have got the opportunity to rule and they should make an honest attempt to form a government and try to fulfil the poll promises made to the people of Delhi. Even if they succeed in a few, their intentions would have at least been shown. That, by itself would be a great positive for the Aam Aadmi Party.

G S Vijay Kumar is a senior corporate executive and a columnist.

Tags

Aam Aadmi Party, Arvind Kejriwal, Assembly Elections 2013, Delhi Elections 2013, Indian Elections, Indian Politics, Political Correctness, Political Satire, Politicians, Politics, Post Elections Scenario In Delhi

Meet the author

author avatar G.S. Vijay Kumar
I am a management graduate and have worked as a senior executive for 25 years in the corporate sector.I am a columnist and write on management, Economics and socio-economic topics.

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