Different Terms used in Canada and the United States

Carol RoachStarred Page By Carol Roach, 11th Jul 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/2cygcz0a/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Culture

Though the culture of Canada and the United States is similar, there are different terms used for things. This article gives a few examples.

Toonies and Loonies

Canada and the United States are so close in culture that we are like sisters. Basically English Canada came from the same parent, England. French Canada has its roots planted in France. We have so many similarities and there are differences of course.

There are other differences as well. We don’t have a dollar bill or a two dollar bill. At one time we had the dollar and two dollar bills but not any more. We have a coin which is called a looney which replaced the dollar bill and another coin which we have instead of a two dollar bill called a tooney. Strange names for our coins I know.


We don’t have greenbacks because our money has different colors and if you tell me you have a couple of Ben Franklins I have no idea what that represents in terms of money.

Pogo or Corndog

The cooking terms are sometimes different. For example, what I call a pogo Americans call corn dogs. For the longest time I did not know what confectioner’s sugar was. I could not follow American recipes that required it. It took my friend who did a lot of baking to tell me that confectioner’s sugar was icing sugar.

As you can see little things like this can make a difference in the understanding of commonly used products.

oleo

Here is where oleo comes in. The first time I heard the word was when I was trying to do a crossword puzzle and one of the answers I could not get was oleo. I had no idea what it was.

According to Wise Geek, Oleomargarine is oil known today as margarine. The manufacturers add a yellow dye to make it look like butter. Oleo contains pure vegetable oil and other ingredients such as salt, and skim milk.

In Canada, margarine had to be white and Quebec was the last province to allow margarine to become yellow again in 2008. The reason for the white color in the first place was to avoid consumers thinking they are buying butter when they are actually buying margarine.

Now butter and margarine are terms I know and understand. I do eat both. I am not much of an oil person except for frying French fries, but most of the time I make them in the oven now.

Since I now know what oleo is I at least can answer that puzzle question; but I can’t say much for the others. There are still some unfamiliar terms that I will have to get used to solve a puzzle.


All photos taken from the public domain


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Tags

Benjamins, Butter, Canadian Money, Confectioners Sugar, Corn Dogs, Food, Greenbacks, Icing Sugar, Loonies, Margarine, Money, Oleo, Pogos, Toonies

Meet the author

author avatar Carol Roach
Retired therapist and author of two books, freelance writer, newsletter editor, and blogger. I write, health, mental health, women's issues, animal , celebrity, history, and SEO articles.

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Comments

author avatar Lady Aiyanna
11th Jul 2015 (#)

That explains the drinking, illness and grotty behavior. They were also prisoners of mother England. Criminals so to say by ancestry.
Nz more of mad people but I am naturalized and not by descent.
You are of descent with hot dogs and pig fat. I touch not either.

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author avatar Lady Aiyanna
11th Jul 2015 (#)

It's in the behavior too.

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author avatar Lady Aiyanna
11th Jul 2015 (#)

Seen it had a friend with fibromyalgia who behaved such. He was canoodling a satanist so broke friendship which meant a lot to me and left. My tears don't matter to him, he was always heartless but weirdly caring who failed to see things the way it was but made me the writer I am today.

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author avatar Lady Aiyanna
11th Jul 2015 (#)

My Italian friend called them pink and porky.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
11th Jul 2015 (#)

As an Englishman, living in Canada, there are plenty of Canadian terms that I have to translate everyday, as there are many American terms that I have had to get used to. In Canada I see more of what passes for French than I did in Britain yet there are many products here in Canada where French people would raise an eyebrow (or two) and call the usage Franglais.

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author avatar Carol Roach
12th Jul 2015 (#)

we we speak on the streets in Quebec is called joual. It is the mixture of french and english. It is spoken on the streets but of course when writting once should write properly. There are also excepted terms which are exclusively Quebec, just like the Canadian pogo or the American corndog.

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author avatar Peter B. Giblett
12th Jul 2015 (#)

I was meaning that the French authorities would ban many Canadian products because the French names used on Canadian packaging would not be seen as acceptable in France because of the English words, such as chaddar that are included.

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author avatar Carol Roach
12th Jul 2015 (#)

oh that is interesting. Thank you for this info I didn't know.

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author avatar brendamarie
12th Jul 2015 (#)

Carol, very interesting to know, the little differences. Great article

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author avatar Kingwell
13th Jul 2015 (#)

Thanks Carol and as Canadians we are proud of our friendship with our neighbor to the south but we are a different people. Blessings.

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author avatar Papa KyKy
13th Jul 2015 (#)

Thank you Carol. Great post!I live in the US and have visited Canada twice. There is also a slight accent difference, but you have to pay attention closely to hear it.

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