Distribution of physically challenged students (Age 6-14 years) in Mathura District (India)

Mrs Rakhi Sharma By Mrs Rakhi Sharma, 20th Feb 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/dc52q64k/
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Present study was conducted to examine distribution of disabled students between age group 6-14 years in Mathura. 25 schools from each of urban and rural localities were selected randomly for study. Students of 6-14 year age group were interviewed or examined to diagnose disability. Disabilities in males were higher than that of females. Most of them had physical followed by locomotive, multiple and speech & hearing disability and mental retardation.

Distribution of physically challenged students (Age 6-14 years) in Mathura District (India)

Abstract
Present study was conducted to examine distribution of disabled students between age group 6-14 years in Mathura. 25 schools from each of urban and rural localities were selected randomly for study. Students of 6-14 year age group were interviewed or examined to diagnose disability. Disabilities in males were higher than that of females. Most of them had physical followed by locomotive, multiple and speech & hearing disability and mental retardation.
Keywords:

6-14 year age group, Disable pupil, Elementary education, Females, India, Handicapped student, Males, Mathura, Mental retardation, Physically challenged child, Primary schools, Rural localities, Special education, Urban localities.

Introduction:

A physically challenged child may be defined as a child who has a disability of locomotor and neurological origin which constitutes disadvantages or restrictions in one or more aspects of daily living activities. It may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory and emotional type. The disability may be congenital or acquired.
Teachers view fellow professionals as those who abet the planning process. They identified budgetary factors, accountability factors, access to equipment and materials, and physical environment in the classroom and school as barriers in managing physically challenged students (Schumm and Vaughn, 1992). Students in the school which included peers with disabilities generally indicated the more positive attitudes (Clunies-ross and O'meara, 1989). Impairments in young children need to be reviewed in the initial phase of the disability process, which if not addressed properly, leads to add secondary disabilities and so many other complexes as the child grows. Planning of rehabilitation of such type of child at local level should consider quality and quantity and care required accordingly for different types of disabilities (Padmamohan et al. 2009).
The purpose of this survey was to examine and create a clear-cut picture of the distribution of physically challenged students between age group 6 and 14 years in Mathura District (India). The outcomes of the study may facilitate the general education teachers' perceptions and feelings about planning for physically challenged students as well as their planning practices.

Materials and Methods:

Present survey was conducted to find out the distribution of physically challenged students at elementary level in Mathura District (India). Twenty five elementary schools from each of urban and rural localities were selected randomly for the study. The students of 6-14 year age group (n=1454) were interviewed or examined for diagnosis of disabilities. The observations were statistically analysed using suitable statistical model (Snedecor and Cochran, 1994).

Results and Discussion:

The findings of the research work are presented in figure. It can be revealed on the basis of observations that disabilities in male students in comparison that in females remained higher. Most of the students were physically disabled followed by locomotive, multiple and speech and hearing disability. Mental retardation was observed to be lowest in comparison to other types of disabilities. Padmamohan et al. (2009) reported almost similar patterns of disabilities in the state of Kerala. Ahmad, (2012) explored that the majority of children with disabilities in developing countries are currently out of school, while many of those enrolled are not learning. The major barriers that confront with inclusion of children with special needs for adequate learning are as barriers Related to Time and Skills, physical Barriers, attitudinal Barriers, curricular Barriers and communication Barriers.
The findings of the study indicated that the physically disabled children needed for planning for instituting easily accessible learning programmes, incorporating existing social welfare and health service. There is a burning need of development of infrastructural facilities for children with disability and creating community awareness regarding childhood disability. There was also a requirement for proper utilization of rehabilitation plans necessary for increasing the utilization of schemes available. Planning at the local level should consider the difference in quality and quantity of care required for different types of disability in such type of children.
The physically challenged students under research work were requiring special schools as per their particular disability problem but those were continuing their study in the similar schools; therefore they were feeling srious difficulties in learning. Englert et al., (2009) has revealed that the students with disabilities have more difficulties in using the learning-to-learn strategies as they read, study, and write expository texts, although neither group is judged to be highly proficient. However, from the educational point of view, not all the pupils with physical disabilities required special school provisions. There may be variations in duration or severity among physical disabilities.

Conclusion:

It can be concluded on the basis of present investigation that disabilities in male students in comparison that in females remained higher in the district Mathura (India). Most of the physically challenged children were physical followed by locomotive, multiple and speech and hearing disability. Mental retardation was observed to be lowest in comparison to other types of disabilities. Not all the pupils with physical disabilities were requiring special education programmes but some of them needed same provisions. The requirement was dependent on the variations in duration or severity among physical disabilities.

References:

Ahmad, W. 2012. Barriers of Inclusive Education for Children with Intellectual Disability. Indian Streams Reserach Journal, 2, II, 1-4.
Clunies-ross, G. and O'meara, K. 1989. Changing the attitudes of students towards peers with disabilities. Australian Psychologist, 24, 2, 273-284.
Englert, C.S.; Mariage, T.V.; Okolo, C.M.; Shankland, R.K.; Moxley, K.D.; Courtad, C.A.; Jocks-Meier, B.S.; O'Brien, J.S.; Martin, N.M. and Chen, H. 2009. The Learning-to-Learn Strategies of Adolescent Students With Disabilities: Highlighting, Note Taking, Planning, and Writing Expository Texts. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 34, 3, 147-161.
Padmamohan, J. et al. (2009). Utilization of rehabilitation services by rural households with disabled. preschool children. Indian Pediatrics, January, 46 (Sup) : 79-82.
Schumm, J.S. and Vaughn, S. 1992. Planning for mainstreamed special education students: Perceptions of general classroom teachers. Exceptionality: A Special Education Journal, 3, 2, 81-98.
Snedecor, G.W. and Cochran, W.G. 1994. Statistical Methods, 8th Ed., Ames, Iowa State University Press.

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Comments

author avatar jpcmc
20th Feb 2013 (#)

We need to understand the profile of people disability and how the school system address their needs. Everyone has equal rights to education.

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