Mummering - A Christmas Tradition in Newfoundland.

Kingwell By Kingwell, 20th Dec 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1b_i-xcl/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Culture

I talk about the old Christmas Custom of Mummering and how it still continues in parts of Newfoundland.

Any Mummers 'loud' In?

Although it is a Christmas custom, it is almost unknown for anyone to go mummering on Christmas night or on a Sunday. Starting on Boxing day, (which we always knew as St Stephen’s day when I was a boy) and continuing to Old Christmas day, Jan.6 – any time after darkness set in you might expect a knock on your door with the traditional greeting ”any mummers allowed in”? As Children we would visit nearby houses during the early hours of the night, and although I feel certain that everyone knew who we were, they would make much of trying to guess our identity. We knew nothing of Halloween and today’s “trick or treat”, so this was our chance to dress up and have some fun, maybe even get a treat.

The Mummers Song

For a time, especially in the late 1960’s and the 1970’s, the old tradition seemed to fade in many parts of the province, but thanks to the locally popular musical duo, Simini, it has been revived. Simini wrote and recorded “The Mummer’s Song” in 1982 and once again sometime during the Christmas season, it’s common, at least in the smaller towns, to see mummers going from door to door. They sing the old Christmas songs and ask as so many of their ancestors did -”any mummers 'loud' in"?
The Mummer’s Song may be viewed on You Tube.

Tags

Accordion, Christmas Cake, Christmas Tradition, Dancing, Mummering, Mumming, Newfoundland, Pagan Custom, Simini, The Mummers Song, The Twelve Days Of Christmas

Meet the author

author avatar Kingwell
I am 75 years old and retired.I like writing short stories, poetry as well other articles of interest.

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Comments

author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
20th Dec 2014 (#)

Let these traditions live on to make us reflect on our past. These give a thrill to our children too. Thanks Kingwell - siva

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author avatar Kingwell
20th Dec 2014 (#)

Thanks Siva and I agree.

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author avatar M G Singh
20th Dec 2014 (#)

Thanks for some lovely info

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author avatar Kingwell
20th Dec 2014 (#)

Thank You Madan.

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author avatar Nancy Czerwinski
20th Dec 2014 (#)

I love reading about traditions. Thanks Kingwell for sharing this great article. I've been so busy getting ready for Christmas that I haven't had time to write. After the holidays I'm going to try to sit down quietly and write. Merry Christmas to you and your family.

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author avatar Kingwell
20th Dec 2014 (#)

Thanks Nancy and Merry Christmas to you and yours. Blessings.

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author avatar Fern Mc Costigan
21st Dec 2014 (#)

Don't lose this one of a kind traditions and keep passing them to the new generations Kingwell, Happy Holidays!

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author avatar Kingwell
21st Dec 2014 (#)

Thanks Fern. Happy Holidays to you!

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author avatar Randhir Bechoo
21st Dec 2014 (#)

Informative.Seasons greetings.

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author avatar Kingwell
21st Dec 2014 (#)

Thanks Randhir - Happy Holidays !

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author avatar tafmona
22nd Dec 2014 (#)

a nice one here, keep sharing good friend

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author avatar Kingwell
22nd Dec 2014 (#)

Thank you tafmona.

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author avatar Dawn143
22nd Feb 2015 (#)

I loved reading your nod to tradition, it sounds like a lovely holiday event. I wish we did it over here in the states! Great glimpse into your life! thank you!

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author avatar Kingwell
22nd Feb 2015 (#)

Thank you Dawn for reading and also for commenting. Blessings.

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