Role of Nervous System During Movements in Writing

johnhite By johnhite, 6th Aug 2018 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/3zxw429u/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Graphology

Two major levels in the nervous system which are influencing the process of handwriting.

Level C

Reducing the coordination of motion does not allow the person who writes to move quickly and in a coordinated manner, which significantly reduces the level of coordination of movements, and the result is a decrease in some degree of productivity, which is manifested in the unevenness, wavelength, holes and stupid endings of strokes and the explored stops.

A higher level of building movements is the "C" level. It is, as noted by N.A. Bernstein in one of his articles, very complex and heterogeneous in anatomical structure and origin. However, all its components are closely linked in functional terms. At the "C" level, the construction of movements is returned to the outside world. Such movements allow you to have space.

To the nerve centers of the level C fit the efferent nerve fibers, which move pulses from the receptors. This makes the circle of movements constructed at the "C" level, rather voluminous. Level "C" gives an estimate of the length, size and shape of movements. Movements that are self-contained at the "C" level are characterized by wealth, diversity, and purposeful character.

Level D

Level "D" is the level of action, which builds the most important background of linguistic and graphic coordination. When cortex is affected, this does not affect the coordination of the motor act, but its implementation.

As a result of deep generalizations at the level "D" formed the content of actions on subjects aimed at active interaction with the outside world. Therefore, one of the most important peculiarities of motion, constructed at this level, are large abstract transformations.

Tags

Handwriting, Nervous System, Writing

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author avatar johnhite
Hello, I'm a linguist, cryptography expert and writer.

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