The Art of Pastiche

The Dolphin's Brain By The Dolphin's Brain, 17th Jun 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Poetry

Pastiche, as opposed to parody, seeks to celebrate the original art it imitates. Here, a famous poem by Thomas Gray, dating from the mid-18th century, given a 21st century update.

Pastiche Written In An Urban Flat

A friend of mine introduced me to the art of pastiche a year or two ago, which led me to having a first attempt. For reasons best known to someone else, for I cannot explain it, I chose Gray's Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard as my target piece. It must have had something to do with the first line, "The curfew tolls the knell of parting day," as it has a pleasing lilt and is instantly recognisable. My poem is shorter than the original - by 28 stanzas! Thus bringing it fully into the modern 'short-attention-span' age. Surely everyone can read 16 lines of poetry!!

Pastiche Written in an Urban Flat

The PC pings the bell to say “Hello!”
And what sweet rapture rests within today?
A ploughman’s (vegan) on the plate below,
Which leaves me free to study all they say.

Those shimmering words across my sight they pass,
To flaunt their wares and tempt with hint of cheek,
Save those of vapid thought so drear and crass,
Which stain the void and ne’er can reach the peak.

Save those from whence my inspiration flows;
No moping do their messages contain,
For off the page, as Harmony just shows,
Comes oft a tender, charming soft refrain.

Beneath those cheery words, that winsome smile,
Where pain and trauma wait to be released;
Each in her way just resting for a while,
The more to take revenge upon the beast.

© The Dolphin’s Brain 2013

Tags

Elegy, Elegy Written In A Country Churchyard, Flat, Online Dating, Pastiche, Poetry, Thomas Gray, Urban

Meet the author

author avatar The Dolphin's Brain
I am a mixed bag of lawyer, vegan, environmentalist and sports nut and my writing is likely to be passionate, of-the-moment articles on a wide variety of topics. I also write the occasional poem!

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