The War is Over, The Peace will be Frightening! Part II.

Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.Starred Page By Ivyevelyn, R.S.A., 17th Aug 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/hdwql_wg/
Posted in Wikinut>Writing>Poetry

"We are taught that suffering is the one promise life always keeps, so that if happiness comes along we know it as a precious gift which is ours for only a short time".

My Husband, Matt (Norman)

My husband estranged, remote and ill at ease,
Came home, tired, traumatized and looking for release.
Now suffering from the constant memories of war,
Never released from horrors, he could not forget.

I always held out hope that he would find some peace
A brave, honorable young man who enlisted for the war.
He returned but there was no safe place, even in his home,
His mind tormented with memories he could only bear alone.

Eyes of a Vietnam Veteran

His eyes showed memories of traumas from the past,
For him the war never came to a calm and peaceful end.
If you had seen his face you would know as well as I
He was forever tormented, he was saved, he did not die.

The last words he spoke to me were, "I need to rest",
When I tried to wake him, his soul had already left.
He looked at peace then, no sign of sorrow or pain,
I knew he could not see me, he would never breathe again.

Matt Died on April 12th, 2012.

Matt was buried with full military honors on April 12th, 2012,
In the Veterans' Memorial Cemetery, Houston, Texas.
Taps sounded by my friend and neighbor, R.E. Woodburn.

This page celebrates Matt's life and the Certificate of Honor recently received from the President.

Author's Note: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychological illness brought about by extreme stress under life-threatening conditions.

Tags

Destroyed Lives, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Unrequited Grief, Vietnam War

Meet the author

author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
I attended the City Literary Institute in London and have a Royal Society of Arts Diploma in English Language.

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Comments

author avatar David Reinstein,LCSW
17th Aug 2012 (#)

May he RIP.

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author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
18th Aug 2012 (#)

Thank you, David. When I recently received the Certificate of Honor from the President, I wanted to bring this page back.

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
17th Aug 2012 (#)

I hope that we have learned something from so many soldiers coming back with PTSD, we must help them mentally return home to a normal life after living through such a hell

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
17th Aug 2012 (#)

a very nice tribute..thank you

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author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
18th Aug 2012 (#)

There is treatment for PTSD but sometimes the soldiers can only find some relief in self-medicating which destroys them anyway.

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author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
18th Aug 2012 (#)

Thank you, cnwriter. Your comment is accepted with appreciation for your return as a friend and supporter.

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author avatar Buzz
18th Aug 2012 (#)

A fine tribute to a hero. May he rest in peace!

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
18th Aug 2012 (#)

I empathize with your husband for his sense of hopelessness after seeing and even participating in violence against own. The poignant thought - war is waged by our leaders but the suffering is on the common citizen. We get easily carried away, divided. Victory rings hollow, finally. I recall the words of a WW l veteran - what for the sufferings when a piece of paper is signed and all is back to normal for countries!

My father was an army captain, a doctor in British army, straight out of college during World War ll and saw action in few areas. He never shared his experiences with his children - once just shrugged his shoulders when I asked him. Just too painful to recapture, relive, share! Matt has found real peace at last - an eye-opening share, Ivy - siva

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author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
18th Aug 2012 (#)

Thank you, siva, for sharing, I experienced the same reaction from my father and Matt. My father was in the Battle of the Somme, line after line of men sent into enemy lines and mowed down. He joined the army when he was almost 14 years old. Matt never revealed anything about his time during the war. My previous husband crashed in a helicopter in Viet Cong territory and never spoke about what happened either. I do wonder, siva, why some of us seem lined up to experience so much emotional turmoil in our lives.

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author avatar GV Rama Rao
22nd Aug 2012 (#)

The trauma the veterans go through is beyond words. Probably death was a relief for him.
Since I am from the Armed forces, I could understand his problem. No medication would do.
You may like to read my piece about nightmares and dreams.

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author avatar Ivyevelyn, R.S.A.
22nd Aug 2012 (#)

Thank you GV Rama Rao for reading this page and recognizing the aftermath of war.
I will look for your page on nightmares and dreams.

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author avatar Md Rezaul Karim
27th Aug 2012 (#)

Sad, sour and truly expressed article. Sometimes I feel if War is at all inevitable, or the arms and ammunition incite to fire!

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